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1 edition of Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain found in the catalog.

Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain

  • 205 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Irrigation,
  • Sorghum bicolor,
  • Costs and returns,
  • Crop yield,
  • Irrigated conditions,
  • Production costs,
  • Clay soils,
  • Glycine max,
  • Zea mays,
  • Long term experiments,
  • Continuous cropping

  • Edition Notes

    Includes references

    ContributionsHeatherly, L.G., Elmore, C.D., Spurlock, S.R.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination13 p.
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26358740M

      Various other corn and sorghum studies also suggest that sorghum is less responsive to inputs or management such as fertilizer (Sindelar et al., ), irrigation (Klocke et al., ), and planting density (Lafarge et al., ; Assefa et al., ). Colby and Tribune are about km apart and there are differences in soil type, precipitation. Water uptake and root distribution of soybeans, grain sorghum and corn Afranio Almir Righes Iowa State University Follow this and additional works at: Part of theAgricultural Science Commons,Agriculture Commons, and . Upper Mississippi River Basin MSSP-CL Mississippi River at Clinton, IA , 34 19 40 IOWA-WAP Iowa River at Wapello, IA 32, 73 11 ILLI-VC Illinois River at Valley City, IL 69, 66 15 14 MSSP-GR Mississippi River below Grafton, IL , 48 18 13 Missouri River Basin. Effects of Leguminous and Non-Leguminous Cover Crops and Tillage on Nutrient Leaching in a Corn/Soybean Rotation., Spatial Relation of Apparent Soil Electrical Conductivity with Soil Properties and Crop Yields at Different Topographic Positions.


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Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain by R.A. Wesley Download PDF EPUB FB2

Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi Effects of irrigation on corn alluvial plain an economic analysis. Published by United States Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in [Washington, D.C.]. Written in EnglishPages: Get this from a library.

Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain: an economic analysis. [Richard A Wesley. Carried out a unified program of field studies to specifically determine: 1) effects of soil water (or its lack) on soybean growth and development; 2) factors such as tillage, rotation, irrigation, weed management, and planting environment and time that can be manipulated and/or modified to optimize yield and reduce costs; 3) effect of soil and.

Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain an economic analysis. A Effects of crop rotation and irrigation on soybean and wheat doublecropping on clay soil an economic analysis.

A «Previous. Effects of irrigation on corn, sorghum, and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain an economic analysis A Effects of crop rotation and irrigation on soybean and wheat doublecropping on clay soil an economic analysis.

Grain sorghum is a warm-season grass crop that is very drought and heat tolerant compared with other major crops, Effects of irrigation on corn it well-adapted to hot, dry climates. Since sorghum is typically about 30% less productive than corn and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain book favorable environments, it is best suited to grow in the Midsouth in dryland fields, or where productivity is marginal.

For example, if corn is near the full dent stage in much of your area, the crop water requirement to reach maturity is around 5 inches and typically requires about 24 days. Step 6. Finally, subtract the depth and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain book water needed to take the crop to maturity (Step 5.

Soil and Crop Choice. and Soybean Response to Irrigation in the Mississippi River Alluvial Plain. January seed yields of irrigated and nonirrigated corn. Applied Engineering in Agriculture Vol. 21(2): − American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN − CORN−SOYBEAN AND ALTERNATIVE CROPPING SYSTEMS EFFECTS ON NO 3−N LEACHING LOSSES IN SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE WATER R.

Kanwar, R. Cruse, M. Ghaffarzadeh, A. Bakhsh, D. Karlen, T. Bailey. The primary areal focus is the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, henceforth referred to as the Alluvial Valley to avoid monotonous repetition.

It extends from the vicinity of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, to the Gulf of Mexico. Thornbury called it the Mississippi Alluvial Plain which he divided into the Alluvial Valley and the Deltaic Plain. Grain sorghum is not very responsive to liming, but a soil pH of or less can lead to drastic yield reductions.

Fertility and lime requirements are best determined by soil testing and establishing a realistic yield goal. Weed Management. Before planting grain sorghum, a weed management plan should be developed.

Many Mississippi soybean producers irrigate their crops five or six times a season by applying 2 to 4 inches of water an acre per irrigation.

“We have compared PHAUCET with standard Effects of irrigation on corn practices on several producer fields, and analyzed the number of irrigations during the sorghum, the amount of water, the duration of each irrigation.

The grain yield of sorghum, soybean, and sunflower was 19%, 16%, and 33%, greater, respectively, at mm than at mm irrigation, but similar for. Corn was planted at 20, seeds/acre, soybean atand sorghum at 65, Rainfall in this area varied greatly and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain book to was dry with only 10 inches of rain during the growing season; had 16 inches, and had inches from May 1 to October The objective of this study was to determine the effect of irrigation water quality and irrigation method on corn production in the Virginia-North Carolina coastal plain.

Pioneer corn was grown in and soybean in the Mississippi River alluvial plain book with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) on a Kenansville loamy sand (loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Hapludult) in Suffolk, VA, in   With over 4 million ha irrigated cropland, the Lower Mississippi River Valley is a highly productive agricultural region where irrigation practices are similar and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer (MRVA) serves as a primary source of on-demand irrigation.

The power conversion coefficient method was used to measure season-long irrigation applied by Cited by: Effects of Soybean-Corn Rotation On Seed Composition in Soybean. Abdalla, O. Biomass Production Potential of Wheat, Corn, and Sorghum in Dryland Cropping Environments., Hydraulic Properties of Three Mississippi River Alluvial Soils Under Row Crop Production.

Meki et al. (; simulated maize residue removal effects on nutrient, soil organic carbon losses, and subsequent soybean yield and nitrogen dynamics in the Upper Mississippi River. Statewide irrigated grain sorghum yields have averaged bushels/acre. Non-irrigated grain sorghum yields averaged 79 bushels/acre during this same period.

Grain Sorghum Irrigation (Texas A&M publication) Peak water use for sorghum is just prior to boot stage. Sorghum will use between inches of water during the growing season. Growing drought tolerant crops can save water in regions where irrigation water supply is limited.

The objective of this work was to compare the responses of maize (Zea mays L.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) to deficit irrigation.A field experiment was conducted on a loam soil (Typic Xerofluvent) in Northeast Spain using the sprinkler line-source by: Characterization of labile organic carbon in coastal wetland soils of the Mississippi river deltaic plain: Relationships to carbon functionalities.

Science of the Total Environment – Jeong, C.Y., J.J. Wang, S.K. Dodla, T.L. Eberhardt, and L. Groom. Effect of biochar amendment on tylosin adsorption/desorption and. Effects of supplementary irrigation at three periods of grain sorghum development (a) from emergence to a time after floral initiation was completed (b) during heading and flowering and (c) from ending of flowering to maturity, during two seasons, were : S.

Farah. Potential Aflatoxin and Fumonisin Contamination in Maize Hybrids with Various Ear Formation Properties., Effects of Soybean-Corn Rotation On Seed Composition in Soybean. Abdalla, O. Monitoring Wheat Rusts in Central West Asia and North Africa., Enhancing Durability of Stem Rust Resistance in Spring Bread Wheat in Central and West Asia and.

This disparity between corn and grain sorghum irrigated acres along with declining irrigation capacity in the region prompted our effort to conduct an economic analysis to determine the short-term and long-term profitability of corn and grain sorghum at irrigation capacities ranging from to gpm/acre.

A field experiment was conducted during the and growing seasons to determine the effect of subsurface drainage (SSD) on evapotranspiration (ET) and crop coefficients (K c) for a farm field in the Red River Valley of North total area of the field was 44 ha, half of which had subsurface drainage installed in the fall of at an.

Corn and Soybean Irrigation Guidelines As we traveled through Tunica county today we noticed a few growers received a shower or two recently. Elsewhere across the Delta, a shower would be a welcomed Memorial Day event.

Over the last couple of days we have received numerous questions regarding irrigation initiation for corn and soybeans. include alfalfa, corn, sorghum, soybeans, and wheat.

In Kan-sas, irrigation is a beneficial use requiring a water right, and about 96 percent of water used for irrigation is groundwater (Kansas Department of Agriculture and Kansas Geological Survey, ). Most of the irrigation points of diversion are located within the extent of the HighFile Size: 3MB.

sorghum in Texas is 2 pounds per acre of elemental N for each pounds per acre of grain production expected. Table 1. Effects of plant density and row spacing on grain yields of dryland sorghum.

Row Plants/Acre Plants/Acre Plants/Acre Plants/Acre Wi 41, 55, 76, 38 2, 2, 2, 2, 2 rows/bed 38 in. rows 2, 2, In eastern Nebraska, we evaluated the effects of various amounts of surface crop residues (aboveground dry matter remaining after harvest) on dryland production of no-till corn (Zea mays L.), sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] over a l yr period.

Where crop residues were completely removed after Cited by: Cotton, field corn, soybean, and grain sorghum, have traditionally represented major row crops across Northeast Louisiana agricultural ecosystems.

During years of extreme pest outbreaks or emergence of a new pest, annual arthropod pest control costs can exceed these amounts by as much as %. Because of the great potential arthropod pests have for damaging Louisiana. Response of corn, grain sorghum, and sunflower to irrigation 'in the High Plains of Kansas ' ea, * Schlegel b, eo 0 b,2 Khan a e t 9eo 'so a Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, IBS11S b Southwest Research-Extension Cenr, by: YANKTON, S.D.

(AP) -- The state's corn farmers have an interest in the ongoing debate over how much water should be sent down the Missouri River to support barge traffic, an industry spokeswoman said. Clay soils occupy approximately million acres in the lower Mississippi River floodplain.

These soils are mainly planted to soybean without irrigation. Grain sorghum and rice are also adapted to these soils, but are planted on less acreage. Assessment of a crop's profitability cannot be made from yield data alone.

The water use of two soybean cultivars (Bragg and Ruse) was measured for three seasons for a range of irrigation treatments. The seasonal totals of plant and soil evaporation ranged from to mm or from 36 to 64% of class A pan evaporation for the same period.

Both cultivars extracted approximately 60% of the total extractable soil water in the top m Cited by: Arkansas Corn and Grain Sorghum News Grain sorghum, just like corn does not like wet feet, so having adequate drainage is needed.

Grain sorghum can perform well on clay, silt loams, or population work that we have done under irrigation, increasing populations greater than File Size: KB. The third series of images is simply a "rogues" gallery depicting the total devastation of corn and soybean crops caused by the flood waters of the Wabash River near West Lafayette, Indiana.

The complete loss of the crops is a visually shocking scene. “Corn and sorghum prices are below recent year averages, but sorghum is higher than it was at this time last year,” he said. “We are expecting this to change, and corn to rise above sorghum sometime in the next year or so.” On Sept.

24, sorghum was $ per bushel in Mississippi, and cash corn was $ per bushel, Williams said. Headline® Fungicide Plant Health Summary Corn & Soybean Yield Results and Recommendations. Fatemi, F.

Hydraulic Properties of Three Mississippi River Alluvial Soils Under Row Crop Production. Franklin, E. Cotton Conservation System and Irrigation Effects On Soil Carbon Pools of Tennessee Valley (Alabama) Paleudults. Funderburg, E. In order to screen out the optimum varieties of sweet sorghum to be planted in Yellow River Delta, the agronomy characters of different varieties (strains) of sweet sorghum including jitianza 1 (JZ1), jitianza 2 (JZ2), jitianza 3 (JZ3), jitianza 4 (JZ4), liaosiza 1 (LSZ1), liaotian 1 (LT1), liaotian 3 (LT3), liaotian 6 (LT6) planted in the saline soil of Yellow River Delta were analyzed Cited by: 2.

The effect of simulated rainfall frequency on the pathogenicity of Pratylenchus zeae and P. brachyurus was studied in four greenhouse experiments. Corn and grain sorghum were watered at different intervals during predetermined cycles to create a gradient of water-stressed by: 5.

Pdf sorghum is a pdf grass crop that is very drought and heat tolerant compared with other major crops, making it well-adapted to hot, dry climates.

Since sorghum is typically about 30% less productive than corn in favorable environments, it is best suited to grow in the Midsouth in dryland fields, or where productivity is marginal.Temporal Variation of Soil-Test and Nonexchangeable Potassium during the Non-Growing Season in Corn and Soybean., Influence of Seeding Rate and Nitrogen Rate on Yield Performance of Two Corn Hybrids Differing in Ear Flex on Mississippi River Alluvial Soils.

Grain Sorghum Under Subsurface Drip Irrigation As Influenced By Row Orientation.Runoff and soil losses as affected by corn and soybean tillage systems Ebook. Ghidey and E. E. Alberts Interpretivesummary Cropping and tilfage are two important factors that influence runoff and soil losses.

In this study, conservation tillage (chisel and no-tilt) significantly reduced soil loss relative to conventional tillage.